Mark Twain And The South
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 236

Mark Twain And The South

The South was many things to Mark Twain: boyhood home, testing ground for manhood, and the principal source of creative inspiration. Although he left the South while a young man, seldom to return, it remained for him always a haunting presence, alternately loved and loathed. Mark Twain and the South was the first book on this major yet largely ignored aspect of the private life of Samuel Clemens and one of the major themes in his writing from 1863 until his death. Arthur G. Pettit clearly demonstrates that Mark Twain's feelings on race and region moved in an intelligible direction from the white Southern point of view he was exposed to in his youth to self-censorship, disillusionment, and, ultimately, a deeply pessimistic and sardonic outlook in which the dream of racial brotherhood was forever dead. Approaching his subject as a historian with a deep appreciation for literature, he bases his study on a wide variety of Mark Twain's published and unpublished works, including his notebooks, scrapbooks, and letters. An interesting feature of this illuminating work is an examination of Clemens's relations with the only two black men he knew well in his adult years.

Images of the Mexican American in Fiction and Film
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 282

Images of the Mexican American in Fiction and Film

  • Categories: Art

None

Mark Twain, Southerner and His Attitude Toward the Negro
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 1222

Mark Twain, Southerner and His Attitude Toward the Negro

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 1970
  • -
  • Publisher: Unknown

None

The Mark Twain Encyclopedia
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 848

The Mark Twain Encyclopedia

"A model reference work that can be used with profit and delight by general readers as well as by more advanced students of Twain. Highly recommended." - Library Journal The Routledge Encyclopedia of Mark Twain includes more than 700 alphabetically arranged entries that cover a full variety of topics on this major American writer's life, intellectual milieu, literary career, and achievements. Because so much of Twain's travel narratives, essays, letters, sketches, autobiography, journalism and fiction reflect his personal experience, particular attention is given to the delicate relationship between art and life, between artistic interpretations and their factual source. This comprehensive r...

Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 262

Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson

This collection seeks to place Pudd’nhead Wilson—a neglected, textually fragmented work of Mark Twain’s—in the context of contemporary critical approaches to literary studies. The editors’ introduction argues the virtues of using Pudd’nhead Wilson as a teaching text, a case study in many of the issues presently occupying literary criticism: issues of history and the uses of history, of canon formation, of textual problematics, and finally of race, class, and gender. In a variety of ways the essays build arguments out of, not in spite of, the anomalies, inconsistencies, and dead ends in the text itself. Such wrinkles and gaps, the authors find, are the symptoms of an inconclusive,...

Frontier's End
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 363

Frontier's End

The western frontier was officially pronounced closed in 1890, the year Harvey Fergusson was born in Albuquerque. He spent his life reopening it in a series of novels stretching from the classic Wolf Song to the belatedly acclaimed Grant of Kingdom and The Conquest of Don Pedro. In this first full biography and critical study, Robert F. Gish sees Fergusson as a modern frontiersman in love with the outdoors, women, and writing. The scion of New Mexico family prominent in business and politics, Fergusson moved restlessly from one new frontier to another, always seeking to recreate in his life and work the adventure and freedom enjoyed by his ancestors. After a strenuous open-air life by the Ri...

Mark Twain
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 157

Mark Twain

A collection of criticism on Mark Twain's classic works "Huckleberry Finn" and "Tom Sawyer," in categories such as contemporary reviews, criticism by creative writers, and twentieth-century criticism.

Mark Twain and the Feminine Aesthetic
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 205

Mark Twain and the Feminine Aesthetic

In this 1992 book, Peter Stoneley analyzes Mark Twain's preoccupation with the nature and value of the 'feminine'.

Potsdam, NY
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 128

Potsdam, NY

Red sandstone, lumber, paper, cows, and college students feature prominently in Potsdam. With its selection of two hundred stunning photographs, the book records aspects of life in Potsdam from the mid-1800s to the mid-1900s. Located on the Racquette River between the St. Lawrence River and the Adirondack Mountains, the town is one often that were created in 1787 to promote settlement of New York State. Education has played an important role in Potsdam since 1816, when St. Lawrence Academy opened. The success of the academy led to the establishment in 1866 of a normal school, the forerunner of Potsdam College, with its renowned Crane School of Music.

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Mark Twain
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 888

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Mark Twain

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2013-05-13
  • -
  • Publisher: Routledge

"A model reference work that can be used with profit and delight by general readers as well as by more advanced students of Twain. Highly recommended." - Library Journal The Routledge Encyclopedia of Mark Twain includes more than 700 alphabetically arranged entries that cover a full variety of topics on this major American writer's life, intellectual milieu, literary career, and achievements. Because so much of Twain's travel narratives, essays, letters, sketches, autobiography, journalism and fiction reflect his personal experience, particular attention is given to the delicate relationship between art and life, between artistic interpretations and their factual source. This comprehensive r...