The Fearful Void
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 286

The Fearful Void

'It was because I was afraid that I had decided to attempt a crossing of the great Sahara desert, from west to east, by myself and by camel. No one had ever made such a journey before . . .' In October 1972 Geoffrey Moorhouse began his odyssey across the Sahara from the Atlantic to the Nile, a distance of 3,600 miles. His reason for undertaking such an immense feat was to examine the roots of his fear, to explore an extremity of human experience. From the outset misfortune was never far away; and as he moved further into that 'awful emptiness' the physical and mental deprivation grew more intense. In March 1973, having walked the last 300 miles, Moorhouse, ill and exhausted, reached Tamanrasset, where he decided to end his journey. The Fearful Void is the moving record of his struggle with fear and loneliness and, ultimately, his coming to terms with the spiritual as well as the physical dangers of the desert.

Calcutta
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 408

Calcutta

In the foreword to the first edition Geoffrey Moorhouse wrote: 'In a sense, the story of Calcutta is the story of India . . . It is the story of how and why Empire was created and what happened when Empire finished . . . The imperial residue of Calcutta, a generation after Empire ended, is both a monstrous and a marvellous city. Journalism and television have given us a rough idea of the monstrosities but none at all of the marvels. I can only hope to define the first more clearly and to persuade anyone interested that the second is to be found there too'. Geoffrey Moorhouse succeeds triumphantly in his aims. First published in 1971 this title has stood the test of time. Remarkably it was the first full-length study of Calcutta, seat of the British Raj, since 1918. 'The book is organized out of a profound understanding of the true issues and is brilliantly executed.' Paul Scott, Guardian

To the Frontier
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 286

To the Frontier

Presents an account of the author's three-month journey through Sind, Baluchistan and the Punjab to the legendary North-West frontier of Pakistan.

Hell's Foundations
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 286

Hell's Foundations

There is no shortage of books on the ill-fated Gallipoli campaign of 1915 but this one stands out. In it Geoffrey Moorhouse moves the focus from the more familar aspects to concentrate on one small mill town, Bury, in Lancashire, and to anatomize the long-lasting effect the Dardanelles had on it. Bury was the regimental home of the Lancashire Fusiliers. In the Gallipoli landings of 25 April 1915 it lost a large proportion of its youth. By May 1915, some 7,000 Bury men had already gone to war, to be followed by many others before Armistice Day. More than 1,600,from just three local battalions of the Fusiliers were among those who never returned. The regiment left 1,816 dead men on Gallipoli a...

Sun Dancing
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 284

Sun Dancing

A fictionalized history of fourth-century Irish monks describes their spirituality and their influence on other areas of the world

Great Harry's Navy
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 372

Great Harry's Navy

It was Henry VIII who began the process of making England a first-rate sea-power. He inherited no more than seven warships from his father King Henry VII, yet at his own death the King's Navy had 53 seaworthy ships afloat (much the same size as the Royal Navy today) manned by almost 8,000 sailors. Here was the springboard for Queen Elizabeth's captains (such as Francis Drake) a decade later. As G R Elton has commented (in 'England Under he Tudors') Henry VIII originally needed a navy to hold the English Channel and blockade the enemy while he invaded France. Later when invasion from the continent grew serious Henry's navy fought in many actions. Moorhouse doesn't only deal with seagoing expl...

The Best Loved Game
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 196

The Best Loved Game

'It is now thirty-five years since Geoffrey Moorhouse wrote his cricket classic The Best Loved Game, which also seems unimaginable, but only because it feels like last week. Even so, in that time the game has changed, in many respects beyond recognition, which makes the book more valuable than ever - as an elegy for a lost world.' Matthew Engel, in his new Preface Geoffrey Moorhouse spent the summer of 1978 sampling cricket at every level: from Eton v Harrow to the Lancashire League; from Cambridge undergraduates getting a lesson from Zaheer Abbas to Ian Botham excelling with bat and ball at Lord's; from a farmer's boy making an unbeaten 24 at an Oxfordshire village match to the incomparable clowning of Derek Randall at Trent Bridge. 'Surely destined to rest beside the finest works of this nature in the library of cricket.' David Frith, Wisden Cricket Monthly

Britain in the sixties
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 189

Britain in the sixties

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 1964
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  • Publisher: Unknown

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The Last Office
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 304

The Last Office

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2011-11-10
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  • Publisher: Hachette UK

Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries, through the never-before-told story of how one priory was saved and become Durham's mighty cathedral What happened to the monks, their orders and the communities they served after Henry VIII's break with Rome in 1536? In THE LAST OFFICE Geoffrey Moorhouse reveals how the Dissolution of the Monasteries affected the great Benedictine priory at Durham, drawing for his sources on material that has lain forgotten in the recesses of one of our great cathedrals. The quarrel between Henry VIII and the papacy not only gave birth to the Church of England but heralded the destruction of the 650 or so religious houses that played a central role in the spiritu...

Apples in the Snow
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 192

Apples in the Snow

Starting near the roof of the world on the Soviet Union's border with China, Geoffrey Moorhouse's journey through Central Asia winds across mountains, steppes and desert as well as the path of the retreating Red Army before reaching Tamburlaine's tomb in Samarakand. The sequel to his award winning To the Frontier, Apples in the Snow is both a dramatic history of this wild region and an absorbing portrait of its present. 'A beautifully written account ... Moorhouse is one of the great travellers: everywhere attuned to past and present, to the uneasiness and muted discords of the people about him, to the mundane, the ridiculous and the extraordinary beauties of Central Asia.' "Guardian"