Demons of the Body and Mind
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 244

Demons of the Body and Mind

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2010-07-12
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  • Publisher: McFarland

The Gothic mode, typically preoccupied by questions of difference and otherness, consistently imagined the Other as a source of grotesque horror. Paradoxically, the Other also became a pitiful figure, often evoking empathy. The sixteen critical essays in this collection examine the ways in which those suffering from mental and physical ailments were refigured as Other during the Gothic era, and how they were imagined to be monstrous. Together, the essays highlight the Gothic inclination to represent all ailments as visibly monstrous, even those, such as mental illness, which were invisible. Th.

Property and Power in English Gothic Literature
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 244

Property and Power in English Gothic Literature

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2015-12-29
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  • Publisher: McFarland

"From detailed discussions of Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer to Sarah Water's Affinity, Anolik tackles the question of why possession always fails in the British gothic literary tradition. Clearly written and theoretically informed, this book is a valuable introduction to the burgeoning field of gothic studies."--Diane Long Hoeveler, author of The Gothic Ideology "Beginning with the origins of the Gothic, moving to a rich comparison of numerous nineteenth-century texts, and concluding with a compelling reading of the neo-Victorian contemporary novel, Property and Power in English Gothic Literature traces the Gothic novel's resistance to containment and order as it persistently fragments and ...

Horrifying Sex
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 276

Horrifying Sex

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2007-07-02
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  • Publisher: McFarland

The Gothic moment in literary history arose in the age of the Enlightenment, and the Gothic fascination with the unknown reflects the Enlightenment's response to the limits of reason. Traditionally, the emblem of the unknown that lurks in the Gothic is the supernatural, the monstrous, and the inhuman. Often overlooked is the observation that Gothic texts are also haunted by figures that represent the mystery of sexuality. This collection of essays sharpens that observation and asserts that Gothic anxieties about sexuality are likewise rooted in fear of the unknown, represented by sexual practices and desires that either lie hidden or deviate from cultural norms. The first three sections refer to popular as well as marginalized Gothic texts to portray the three prototypes of sexual "deviance": the female sexual Other in "The Fatal Woman"; the male sexual Other in "The Satanic Male"; and the homosexual Other in "Homosexual Horror." The fourth section covers literary works that celebrate sexual difference and question the idea that the sexually "deviant" is socially Other.

The Gothic Other
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 320

The Gothic Other

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2004-07-01
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  • Publisher: McFarland

The literary use of the Gothic is marked by an anxious encounter with otherness, with the dark and mysterious unknown. From its earliest manifestations in the turbulent eighteenth century, this escapist mode has provided for authors a useful ground upon which to safely confront very real fears and horrors. The essays here examine texts in which Gothic fear is relocated onto the figure of the racial and social Other - the Other who replaces the monster as the code for mystery and danger, the horrifying and the unknowable. The essays reveal that writers from many cannons and cultures are attracted to the Gothic as a ready medium for the expression of racial and social anxieties. The essays are grouped under such topics as race, religion, class, and centers of power.

Dangerous bodies
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 256

Dangerous bodies

"Through an investigation of the body and its oppression by the church, the medical profession and the state, this book reveals the actual horrors lying beneath fictional horror in settings as diverse as the monastic community, slave plantation, operating theatre, Jewish ghetto and battlefield trench. The book provides original readings of canonical Gothic literary and film texts including The Castle of Otranto, The Monk, Frankenstein, Dracula and Nosferatu. This collection of fictionalised dangerous bodies is traced back to the effects of the English Reformation, Spanish Inquisition, French Revolution, Caribbean slavery, Victorian medical malpractice, European anti-Semitism and finally warfare, ranging from the Crimean up to the Vietnam War. The endangered or dangerous body lies at the centre of the clash between victim and persecutor and has generated tales of terror and narratives of horror, which function to either salve, purge or dangerously perpetuate such oppositions. This ground-breaking book will be of interest to academics and students of Gothic studies, gender and film studies and especially to readers interested in the relationship between history and literature."

Cross-Cultural Visions in African American Literature
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 214

Cross-Cultural Visions in African American Literature

  • Type: Book
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  • Published: 2011-05-23
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  • Publisher: Springer

The most influential East-West artistic, cultural, and literary exchange that has taken place in modern and postmodern times was the reading and writing of haiku. Here, esteemed contributors investigate the impact of Eastern philosophy and religion on African American writers such as Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison, offering a fresh field of literary inquiry.

Imagining Autism
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 208

Imagining Autism

A disorder that is only just beginning to find a place in disability studies and activism, autism remains in large part a mystery, giving rise to both fear and fascination. Sonya Freeman Loftis’s groundbreaking study examines literary representations of autism or autistic behavior to discover what impact they have had on cultural stereotypes, autistic culture, and the identity politics of autism. Imagining Autism looks at fictional characters (and an author or two) widely understood as autistic, ranging from Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and Harper Lee’s Boo Radley to Mark Haddon’s boy detective Christopher Boone and Steig Larsson’s Lisbeth Salander. The silent figure trapped inside himself, the savant made famous by his other-worldly intellect, the brilliant detective linked to the criminal mastermind by their common neurology—these characters become protean symbols, stand-ins for the chaotic forces of inspiration, contagion, and disorder. They are also part of the imagined lives of the autistic, argues Loftis, sometimes for good, sometimes threatening to undermine self-identity and the activism of the autistic community.

Muslims in the Western Imagination
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 224

Muslims in the Western Imagination

A Choice 2015 Outstanding Academic Title Throughout history, Muslim men have been depicted as monsters. The portrayal of humans as monsters helps a society delineate who belongs and who, or what, is excluded. Even when symbolic, as in post-9/11 zombie films, Muslim monsters still function to define Muslims as non-human entities. These are not depictions of Muslim men as malevolent human characters, but rather as creatures that occupy the imagination -- non-humans that exhibit their wickedness outwardly on the skin. They populate medieval tales, Renaissance paintings, Shakespearean dramas, Gothic horror novels, and Hollywood films. Through an exhaustive survey of medieval, early modern, and c...

Romanticism, Gender, and Violence
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 244

Romanticism, Gender, and Violence

Combining queer theory with theories of affect, psychoanalysis, and Foucauldian genealogy, Romanticism, Gender, and Violence: Blake to George Sodini theorizes performative melancholia, a condition where, regardless of sexual orientation, overinvestment in gender norms causes subjects who are unable to embody those norms to experience socially expected (‘normal’) gender as something unattainable or lost. This perceived loss causes an ambivalence within the subject that can lead to self-inflicted violence (masochism, suicide) or violence toward others (sadism, murder). Reading a range of Romantic poetry and novels between 1790-1820, but ultimately moving beyond the period to show its conte...

Colonization Or Globalization?
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 172

Colonization Or Globalization?

The essays in this volume present new scholarship on imperial expansion through colonization and globalization from a variety of postcolonial perspectives. Most of the articles are grounded in literary works. National identities and imageries are scrutinized, deconstructing the modernist and utopian idea of a nation as a site of homogeneity, and reviewing the importance of the changing concept of identity in the different phases of decolonization.